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It's Only the End if You Want it to Be

Posts tagged ideas

May 27 '13

Anonymous asked:

I'm sure we're agreed that there are a lot of problematic things in the new52-missing characters, ignoring histories and characterization to say the least. what do you think is the best route of fixing it? unbenching characters and histories into the new continuity, or a flashpoint-like event that will bring DCU back into the pre-boot continuity?

God, I don’t even know at this point.

Tentatively, I’d say some things can be brought back without needing a reboot. Donna Troy, for example - we’ve seen nothing to say that she *couldn’t* exist, we just haven’t seen her. Easy enough to bring her in. Lois and Clark could be put back together and Lois’ presence in the narrative increased with no reboot, although of course the history of their marriage would still be lost.

Other characters can be brought back from the dead with relatively little fuss, and honestly I’ll accept any explanation they want to give. Helena Bertinelli faked her death on a top-secret mission. Damian Wayne was thrown into a Lazarus pit. By comic standards, bringing these characters back could be simple enough (we never actually saw Helena dead, and reincarnation is kinda a thing in Damian’s family.) Just do it.

In a case of a lot of the retconned backstories, I’d say it’s just a simple matter of re-retconning them back into place. Eventually, they’re obviously gonna do another Year One/flashback-story type thing for these characters. Use that to undo some of the changes that were made. Show Tim being Robin, show the original Titans existing (only a few characters make this problematic… see below)… and write these characters with that history in mind.

But then there are thornier problems. Dinah Lance really being Dinah Sr. Shiva suddenly being the same age as Dick, making Cass’s existence impossible (honestly, childish though it may sound, I’d say just go back to writing her as Bruce’s age and pretend that retcon never happened). Garth being a small child. Babs being Batgirl again. And so on.

These issues aren’t so easily undone. Babs, especially, is a tough issue - it’s not as simple as injuring her and putting her back in a wheelchair. Because that’s only superficially what was lost. What was amazing about Oracle wasn’t that she was in a wheelchair - it was the position of power and authority she occupied from that wheelchair, and that’s not an easy thing to get back with this “younger, more inexperienced” Babs.

So it’s issues like that that make me think yes, maybe some kind of Flashpoint-like event is necessary after all. At least to some degree. It would certainly make all of this much easier to undo, but does DC look foolish if they just completely reset their continuity so soon after they just did it? That’s why I doubt they’re going to want to handle things that way.

Sorry, a bit of a muddled answer there, but unfortunately while I can think of several ways of undoing or mitigating the damage, there are no easy solutions here.

Feb 27 '12

jhameia:

What is cultural appropriation « The Long Way Home

ardhra:

O hai! I finally finished writing this! After starting it more than two years ago {facepalm}. There is more to come that I’ve worked on & researched. Hopefully responses to this won’t be so faily that I’m unmotivated to finish the rest.

Excerpt:

There are a number of issues around cultural appropriation which I see continuously bog down discussion. I think they revolve around some crucial issues undergirding the whole concept of cultural appropriation, so I think we need to “get back to basics” somewhat.

Before I go on, I’d like to acknowledge the work of Andrea Smith, particularly her article ‘Spiritual Appropriation as Sexual Violence’, printed in her book Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide as being very influential to my thinking about these issues.

I disagree with a lot of the common definitions of cultural appropriation around. Cultural appropriation isn’t simply the “taking or borrowing of some aspects of another culture from someone outside that culture”. Cultures throughout time have traded, adapted, and borrowed artefacts, symbols, technologies and narratives from one another. The issue isn’t the aesthetic and material mingling of cultures, hybridity, or that human creativity crosses cultural boundaries. Those are aesthetic and perhaps moral issues, separate from the real political issue of cultural appropriation.

A lot of the time cultural appropriation is also called ‘cultural theft’. But cultures aren’t tangible things that can only be possessed by one person. Culture is made up of shared ideas, skills, traditions, styles, images, that circulate through a particular society. Cultures are heterogeneous — people who are part of the same society can be part of different cultures, which influence each other — and they change over time.

The problem isn’t that cultures intermingle, it’s the terms on which they do so and the part that plays in the power relations between cultures. The problem isn’t “taking” or “borrowing”, the problem is racism, imperialism, white supremacy, and colonialism. The problem is how elements of culture get taken up in disempowering, unequal ways that deny oppressed people autonomy and dignity. Cultural appropriation only occurs in the context of the domination of one society over another, otherwise known as imperialism. Cultural appropriation is an act of domination, which is distinct from ‘borrowing’, syncretism, hybrid cultures, the cultures of assimilated/integrated populations, and the reappropriation of dominant cultures by oppressed peoples.

What’s being appropriated in *cultural appropriation* isn’t the things themselves — the images, stories, artefacts, themes, etc. — it’s the capacity of people of oppressed groups to determine the meaning, scope, usage, and future of those things. Cultural appropriation involves taking over peoples’ control over representations of themselves. Cultural appropriation is an attack on cultural autonomy and self-determination, backed up by historically constructed domination.

Look, it’s ardhra being awesome.

This post is just fascinating.

Jan 26 '12
ianisourqueen:

COMMON TUMBLR BEHAVIOUR BY HOGWARTS HOUSE:

Gryffindor
Gryffindors are often those blogs that you see adding their own commentary to every post they make, original or reblogged. They often do this within the actual post itself, rather than in the tags, because that makes it more clear, and that is what they want. Gryffindors want to be noticed, and they want their opinions shared, and blogging is a very simple way to do that. Gryffindors are also very commonly reblogging about issues they care about, and doing this constantly and without any shame. Their strong values come into play with this, and they are this way not only with real life issues but with fandom. If they love a specific movie, ship, or what have you, they will show it; if you feel the need to bash that thing on their dash, you’ll never hear the end of it. Gryffindors being social, also want to have many followers and recognition. Not necessarily to have the most followers (though they appreciate that a lot, also), but because they enjoy having a large array of people in which to speak with. 
Hufflepuff
Not unlike Gryffindors, what you find on the blog of a Hufflepuff will be what you would find in their heart. They are things they care about, issues or things that may seem trivial but have some form of deeper meaning to them. They will often not express this meaning in a direct and blunt form, because they feel uncomfortable doing that. They mostly want their blog to be a welcoming place, and appreciate every follower they get because they feel as though their blog represents all that they enjoy, and through their followers they feel approval. That said, Hufflepuffs don’t pull punches either, and aren’t going to post about things they don’t care for, or vice versa not speak on things they are concerned with. Everything a hufflepuff does is a piece of them, and that includes blogging. Though they may not be quick to socialize with others, if you are to communicate through a hufflepuff via their blog, they will be incredibly friendly and welcoming to you.
Ravenclaw
Ravenclaw bloggers do not often let the ideas and views of others get in their way. Ravenclaws are naturally intellectual artists, and everything which they have is a canvas, including a blog. They may not have the busiest blog at times, because they don’t want to reblog or post everything in sight. If they enjoy it, it makes clear sense to them and they find it stimulating, then they will, but they think it through as they do with everything. They are not shy to give their opinions, but they are often a bit more blunt in this area than would be a Gryffindor or Hufflepuff. They will put their most notable points within a post, and leave the details either unsaid or in the tags. A blog to them is what is important, so they don’t want theirs to be at all trivial. Followers are not a large concern for them, but those that they do have they will treat with consideration and accommodation.
Slytherin
Aside from Gryffindors, many more well known blogs on tumblr are run by bloggers whom are Slytherins. This is due to not only their ambition, but their natural ability to impress. Slytherins are very sure to keep with their own ideas, but they will also glitter them to the fullest extent, making them appealing even to the most hesitant of persons. This makes them have a draw that many others enjoy. Slytherins are as strongly into saying what they think as are Gryffindors, however they are a bit more subtle about it. You will often find snakes with a swarm of tags under their posts, because that is where they would rather vent instead of cover a post with words; this counts even more so if said post is a graphic or photoset. Aesthetics is a very pleasant thing, and this means a Slytherin blogger will often be well organize and have everything looking clean and precise. Slytherins enjoy having plenty of followers because it makes them feel more sure in themselves, though they also have no problem losing some if it is for good reason. They have a hard time sugar coating things, but they still do appreciate those who are kind to them, and try to be as cordial as possible. 


This is very interesting and well-thought-out. I think it’s probably pretty accurate, too.
I consider myself a Hufflepuff and that definitely describes my blog, although I do have the Gryffindor habit of adding comments to whatever I reblog, often just a few lines but sometimes entire mini-essays. In my case, though, I think it has less to do with me being a very bold and outspoken person (though I can be that way sometimes), and more to do with the fact that I’m extremely talkative and don’t know when to shut up XD.

ianisourqueen:

COMMON TUMBLR BEHAVIOUR BY HOGWARTS HOUSE:

Gryffindor

Gryffindors are often those blogs that you see adding their own commentary to every post they make, original or reblogged. They often do this within the actual post itself, rather than in the tags, because that makes it more clear, and that is what they want. Gryffindors want to be noticed, and they want their opinions shared, and blogging is a very simple way to do that. Gryffindors are also very commonly reblogging about issues they care about, and doing this constantly and without any shame. Their strong values come into play with this, and they are this way not only with real life issues but with fandom. If they love a specific movie, ship, or what have you, they will show it; if you feel the need to bash that thing on their dash, you’ll never hear the end of it. Gryffindors being social, also want to have many followers and recognition. Not necessarily to have the most followers (though they appreciate that a lot, also), but because they enjoy having a large array of people in which to speak with. 

Hufflepuff

Not unlike Gryffindors, what you find on the blog of a Hufflepuff will be what you would find in their heart. They are things they care about, issues or things that may seem trivial but have some form of deeper meaning to them. They will often not express this meaning in a direct and blunt form, because they feel uncomfortable doing that. They mostly want their blog to be a welcoming place, and appreciate every follower they get because they feel as though their blog represents all that they enjoy, and through their followers they feel approval. That said, Hufflepuffs don’t pull punches either, and aren’t going to post about things they don’t care for, or vice versa not speak on things they are concerned with. Everything a hufflepuff does is a piece of them, and that includes blogging. Though they may not be quick to socialize with others, if you are to communicate through a hufflepuff via their blog, they will be incredibly friendly and welcoming to you.

Ravenclaw

Ravenclaw bloggers do not often let the ideas and views of others get in their way. Ravenclaws are naturally intellectual artists, and everything which they have is a canvas, including a blog. They may not have the busiest blog at times, because they don’t want to reblog or post everything in sight. If they enjoy it, it makes clear sense to them and they find it stimulating, then they will, but they think it through as they do with everything. They are not shy to give their opinions, but they are often a bit more blunt in this area than would be a Gryffindor or Hufflepuff. They will put their most notable points within a post, and leave the details either unsaid or in the tags. A blog to them is what is important, so they don’t want theirs to be at all trivial. Followers are not a large concern for them, but those that they do have they will treat with consideration and accommodation.

Slytherin

Aside from Gryffindors, many more well known blogs on tumblr are run by bloggers whom are Slytherins. This is due to not only their ambition, but their natural ability to impress. Slytherins are very sure to keep with their own ideas, but they will also glitter them to the fullest extent, making them appealing even to the most hesitant of persons. This makes them have a draw that many others enjoy. Slytherins are as strongly into saying what they think as are Gryffindors, however they are a bit more subtle about it. You will often find snakes with a swarm of tags under their posts, because that is where they would rather vent instead of cover a post with words; this counts even more so if said post is a graphic or photoset. Aesthetics is a very pleasant thing, and this means a Slytherin blogger will often be well organize and have everything looking clean and precise. Slytherins enjoy having plenty of followers because it makes them feel more sure in themselves, though they also have no problem losing some if it is for good reason. They have a hard time sugar coating things, but they still do appreciate those who are kind to them, and try to be as cordial as possible. 

This is very interesting and well-thought-out. I think it’s probably pretty accurate, too.

I consider myself a Hufflepuff and that definitely describes my blog, although I do have the Gryffindor habit of adding comments to whatever I reblog, often just a few lines but sometimes entire mini-essays. In my case, though, I think it has less to do with me being a very bold and outspoken person (though I can be that way sometimes), and more to do with the fact that I’m extremely talkative and don’t know when to shut up XD.

Nov 28 '11

Five Other Television Projects DC/WB Should Do

dcwomenkickingass:

The pilot season for next fall is already underway and we’ve heard the second DC associated project float out into the Hollywood trades. I have to admit the idea of Booster Gold being developed into a TV series was a bit of a surprise. Not as big as the earlier news about Deadman, however.

With all the other interesting intellectual property just laying around at DC, it confounds me why we keep hearing about projects like this and last year’s Raven (which appears not to have gone anywhere). More importantly with Marvel having announced three live action television projects at SDCC and one of them, aka Jessica Jones, pretty far along in development, why doesn’t DC have more shows on the air?

Except for their Superman properties (Lois and Clark, Superboy, Smallville), since the 1980 DC and Warner Bros. live action television properties have consisted of Birds of Prey, Swamp Thing, The Flash, and last year’s Human Target. Of those only Swamp Thing lasted more than one season.

There have been attempts, of course, some that never made it to pilot stage such as The Graysons, some that had “test footage” such as Blue Beetle and others that did make it all the way to film such as Aquaman, Justice League and David E. Kelley’s combination of “STRONG FEMALE CHARACTERS” and the Wonder Woman*.

With all that in mind, here are a few projects that DC might want take a look developing in addition to Booster Gold and Deadman. And if you are wondering if they have kick ass female characters in them, why yes, yes they do.

Read More

Some excellent ideas here. I would totally watch Gotham City Law and Order or The Huntress. I am a bit iffy about whether they could make Ralph & Sue Dibny: Ghost Detectives work without having it be the cheesiest thing ever, but if they could pull it off, I think that would be great too.

Power Girl, too, I think would be incredibly easy to mess up, but incredibly excellent if done right. 

I have to admit, though, the #1 thing I wish is that they would do a proper Birds of Prey TV show. Based on the Dixon-Simone era. Where Oracle stays Oracle, and Dinah isn’t a teenager, and Helena isn’t a “half meta-human”, and most importantly, they all have their canon personalities. (Well, Babs did, from the little I’ve seen of that show. But they all should.) 

If it became a big success, it might even persuade DC to restore Babs as Oracle, or at least have some serious regret for their decision.