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It's Only the End if You Want it to Be

Posts tagged truth

Jul 30 '14

feferi-captor:

get out your VCR’s it’s time to watch The Prince of Egypt. or you can watch it here.

please don’t watch exodus: gods and kings because it’s icky and racist. you deserve better. you deserve the prince of egypt.

Jan 8 '14

goddess-of-apples:

snorlaxlovesme:

rosereturns:

things said in majority of movies:

  • "I TRUSTED YOU!!"
  • "she’s not just some girl!"
  • "I should have told you this a long time ago."
  • "I’m not a little girl anymore!!"
  • "but I love him!!"

-“You’re giving up your dream!”
  “No dad, I’m giving up YOUR dream.”

"I knew your father. He was a good man."

Jul 14 '13

(Source: bellecs)

Oct 4 '12

thedisasterwillbeyours:

hpphans:

personally-victimized-by-comics:

koriandr:

you can use a character’s tragic past to understand their choices/motivation without using it to excuse them for the nasty things they do

#About Erik

#About Loki #About Damon #About Snape #About Anakin #About Sweeney #About everyone in Supernatural

THIS. THANK YOU.

Look, I’m all for understanding a character’s nuances and motivations. But the thing is, having a bad childhood or a tragic past does not give you complete license to be an absolutely awful person for the rest of your life, hurt innocent people and take out all of your anger on undeserving targets, and get a free pass for all of it. That’s not how morality works. After a certain point, if you are mentally sane, understand and are in control of your own actions, then you have to take responsibility for those actions. No matter how much you’ve suffered or how hard your life has been, if you made those choices, then that’s on you.

(Source: thewintersoldier)

Sep 6 '12
filibuster-vigilantly:

gothambeat:

;_;

Kept the tags because — augh. AUGH. Jason needs all the hugs.

This scene just breaks my heart, every time. He was so happy.

filibuster-vigilantly:

gothambeat:

;_;

Kept the tags because — augh. AUGH. Jason needs all the hugs.

This scene just breaks my heart, every time. He was so happy.

(Source: snikette)

Aug 22 '12
differenzeartistiche:

verogeller:

Why Dana Delany wins at life

DANA oh my god this made my day.
She’s channeling some serious Lois in that single tweet it makes my heart cry because there’s more true Lois in those 10 words than in a year’s worth of DCnU.

^ Agreed. I think she hit the nail right on the head.

differenzeartistiche:

verogeller:

Why Dana Delany wins at life

DANA oh my god this made my day.

She’s channeling some serious Lois in that single tweet it makes my heart cry because there’s more true Lois in those 10 words than in a year’s worth of DCnU.

^ Agreed. I think she hit the nail right on the head.

Aug 18 '12

School’s going to be starting up soon so to everyone on Tumblr…

totally-relatable:

Jul 31 '12
"‎We do not need magic to change the world. We carry all the power we need inside ourselves already: we have the power to imagine better."
J.K. Rowling (via winter-mourning)
Jul 26 '12
"An intimate relationship does not banish loneliness. Only when we are comfortable with who we are can we truly function independently in a healthy way, can we truly function within a relationship. Two halves do not make a whole when it comes to a healthy relationship: it takes two wholes."
Patricia Fry (via lucifelle)
Apr 16 '12

OK, Time To Break It Down

  • When someone says "racist", what they mean is: There is a systematic, entrenched, system which treats white people as advantaged and privileged and people who are not white as inferior and disadvantaged. This means that although some progress has been made toward equalization of all races, we are still far from true equal footing for all people of all races. What is needed to help with this equalization is for you to realize that the privilege and advantage is still there, whether you mean to benefit from it or not. What is needed to help with this equalization is for you to realize that PoC need safe spaces. What is needed to help with this equalization is for you to help push for PoC history to be in schools. For the teachers to stop writing PoC students off as "going to amount to nothing". For the authorities to stop treating PoC as ten times more dangerous and criminal than white people when we're not.
  • What some white people hear "racist" what they hear is: You are a bad person. You are an evil person. You are a Klan member wannabe, even if you don't wear the white hood. You burn crosses on lawns. You use the N word even though you know black people don't like it. You would be like the ones who make the news, dragging PoC behind their vehicles, shooting them for looking "suspicious" and beating them up for fun if you thought you could get away with it. You would back up returning to slavery and segregation! You hate all people who are not white!
  • Why non-PoC want to be able to say the N word: They think it's just a mean, unkind, rude, unpleasant word. That's all. Nothing more. Sticks and stones. No different than honky or cracker.
  • Why the N word offends many PoC: It is not just a rude word like "dummy" or "stupid" or "asshole". It is a word that was used, for the duration of slavery and beyond, to keep PoC oppressed, and to remind them that if they stood up for themselves they would be whipped, beaten, attacked, mutilated, and KILLED. Let me repeat: KILLED. We fought hard for the right to be treated like HUMAN BEINGS. The N word is an indication that there are still many white people out there who don't think of us as HUMAN BEINGS and don't want us to be treated like HUMAN BEINGS. So it's not just "black people are being mean and not letting us say it." Cracker, by the way, does not mean little thing with salt on it that you put cheese on. It means the one who cracked the whip while PoC were slaves.
  • So think about these things before you start getting defensive at PoC. And think about why you're getting defensive. Think about why you want to deny the truth of other people's experiences when you have no way of having that experience yourself.
  • Why do you want to be able to say a word that is sending the message to PoC that you want them to be as they were during slavery and segregation times. If you don't want to send that message. If you don't sincerely feel that way, then there is no valid reason -- NONE -- to want to use the word.
Mar 5 '12

The War on Lois Lane

mayak46:

Sometimes I think Lois Lane has been a lightning rod since the day she was introduced to the world back in 1938 in Action #1.  She was very much a reflection of the times or at least a reflection of how the media portrayed women back then.   Women were smart, sassy, fast talking and often self-sufficient.   Women like Katharine Hepburn, Rosalind Russell, Barbara Stanwyck and so many others.   When I watch  His Girl Friday,  for example, I see Lois Lane.  If I could time travel and pick my perfect cast for a Superman movie I’d cast Rosalind Russell as Lois Lane and Gregory Peck as Clark Kent/Superman.    

Then came the 1950s and the insanity of the Silver Age.  Lois Lane was gutted and she became a punch line.  Everyone knows the image,  Lois Lane wearing her frilly apron dreaming of marrying Superman.   Where did the wise cracking, career driven Rosalind Russellesque woman go?   In her place was this pale imitation.

A lot of what happened to Lois was, I think, a byproduct of the 1950s culture.   Mystery Science 3000 did some hilarious (to me at least) riffs on the shorts of that era .  It was a time when women were taught they should dream of finding a husband, taking care of him, house and kids and not wish for anything more.  My husband wonders if it wasn’t a response to post World War 2 with people trying to reset the culture in to more traditional roles.  During the war women were in the work force and were performing a lot of traditionally male jobs.  It was war and there wasn’t time to worry about gender roles.   The 1950s seemed like an attempt to get everyone back in to their respective seats if you will.   It makes sense to me but then neither my husband nor I are sociologists or historians. 

However, even taking in to account the times, there is still something very disrespectful in what was done to Lois Lane.  She was turned in to a caricature of herself.  The full burden of the triangle for two was put on her shoulders.   Clark Kent was the disguise and his disguise was its own caricature.  He was timid, not a go getter and often portrayed as afraid of his own shadow.   Lois was strong, although in the 1950s Lois’s strength wasn’t celebrated as much as it was held up as a flaw.   Yet because Lois was attracted to the man Clark really was, that being Superman, she was treated as some type of power hungry gold digger.   If I had a dime for every time I’ve heard that Lois doesn’t love the man, she only loves his powers, I’d have enough money to buy DC Comics.  Oh that I did and could!!    It infuriates me.  On one hand the story tells me that Superman is the man but because Lois refuses to settle for the disguise she’s somehow a terrible person.

Superman was not the innocent victim in these stories.  He led Lois on over and over again, and every single time his Clark Kent mask fell and she saw the strong man hiding beneath, she was interested in Clark Kent.  However, then what does Superman do?  He sabotages himself but in a way that makes Lois look the fool.  Lois could never win.  If she saw beneath Clark’s meek disguise she was made to look foolish but if she went after Superman she was a man hungry gold digging harpy.    Superman escaped all responsibility.  Years later from the lens of the modern age a site was started to celebrate what his behavior really was.  Super Dickery.  

In the 70s the Bronze age treated Lois with more respect most likely because of women’s liberation and the changing attitudes towards women and their long term role in society.  

A lot of thoughtful and good people, many who I call friends, hold up the post crisis as being great for Lois Lane. I have mixed reviews.  I think it was getting better but Lois was still asked to carry the burden of the triangle for two on her own.   With Clark being the personality there was no good reason for her not to be interested in Clark so an artificial one was created.   He scooped her on the Superman story and she held on to that resentment for a few years.  This bugged me no end.  She is a professional not a middle school kid.  

It wasn’t until Birthright by Waid that I felt Lois Lane finally recovered from decades of character neglect and deconstruction.   This story was able to take core elements of the Lois & Superman relationship and infuse it with modern day sensibilities.  In the story Clark was also updated and given responsibility for maintaining his disguise and expected to face the consequences of living life as two people .  

The Superman/Lois relationship was also given emotional depth.   Superman’s alien heritage is front and center and treated as the liability it is.   If somebody flies down from the sky with god like powers people are *not* going to complacently shout “MY HERO”.   That makes absolutely no sense.   I think how Waid crafted the Lois & Superman dynamic was lovely because he leveraged off of Superman’s own fears.  The first thing Superman said to Lois after he saves her in his first public save was not to be afraid.  She’s been chasing the flying man rumors for years , she’s not afraid, she’s excited and shoves her card in his hand and told him she wasn’t afraid and after he finishes the urgent job ahead to contact her.   Superman flies away with a goofy grin saying to himself “she’s not afraid”. 

Lois’s fearlessness and strength is what attracts this Superman.  He is amazed this woman believes in him and is willing to help him fight Luthor.   She trusts him.  

She also stands up for Clark Kent.   Clark Kent first meets her in Birthright as she’s standing up to one of the bosses who is harassing Jimmy and he is wowed.  

This *is* Lois Lane.  When I first read that issue I had tears in my eyes.  Finally!!  FINALLY!  Lois Lane as she should be.   Rosalind Russell is back baby!    

Johns’ Secret Origin took a page from Birthright and followed the alien heritage track and had Lois champion Superman while the majority feared him. 

Then came the reboot.  

When I first heard about it I wasn’t worried.  I thought if they could tell the triangle for two the way Birthright and/or Secret Origin hinted at I was in for a very interesting ride.  I could live with the retconning of the marriage if they told the story in a way which celebrated Lois Lane as the first lady of DC Comics.

Then the first interviews were published and I read the comments made about Lois Lane and how writers like Morrison view the character and their thoughts on what being a strong woman meant.  I felt that sick feeling in the pit of my stomach.   

The current run on Action has read to me as a pale imitation of what both Birthright and Secret Origin were trying to do.   I see a lot of the themes from both those books but I think both Waid and Johns handled them a lot better.  

Admittedly I’m reading these stories as a huge fan of both Superman and Lois Lane.   

The Superman title hasn’t been all that much better for me.   The last page of Superman 1 felt like a 20 year step back.   Lois Lane again is used as a club to punch Clark with Clark not expected to take any responsibility for his choices.   I understand the reason for the scene, to make the reader feel sorry for Clark. There was a scene in Birthright which accomplished the same thing but without making Lois the reason, she even came to his defense even as her co-workers mocked her interest in Superman.

Lois has been sidelined in the new 52.  She’s no longer an investigative reporter and this is a huge part of who she is.  Lois Lane: Girl Reporter.   She thrives on the thrill of the chase and bringing in the bad guys through the power of the press.   

Lois has lost her fire in the new 52.   Her relationship with her dad in Secret Origin in contrast with how it’s been written now is stunning.   She’s more passive and far less insightful in the new 52.  The Lois Lane of old wouldn’t go for shallow men like the guy she was with at end of Superman 1 or Corben.   Secret Origin gave us a strong Lois who saw Corben for who he was long before he turned in to Metallo but in this current Action run she’s shown in what I think is a pretty shallow light.    

This doesn’t surprise me though because I think Lois was the weakest link in All Star Superman.  She gets superpowers for example and instead of going out to right wrongs she’s making diamonds out of coal and passively allowing 3 men to fight over her.   She has powers, why doesn’t she go over there and punch them all and tell them she’s not a prize to be won then go save the day?  I don’t think Morrison understands Lois Lane at all and nothing I’ve read in Action has made me think otherwise. 

The strangest thing to me out of all of this though is there is no triangle for two in the new 52.  Apparently strong women shouldn’t need to be rescued or even need a Superman?  If that’s the case I don’t think Jimmy should need rescuing any time he’s in a fix because of his dangerous job.    

Why shouldn’t Lois be attracted to Superman?  Why would that diminish her as a strong woman?  It doesn’t but I think it goes back to the 1950s idea where Lois Lane’s attraction to Superman is portrayed as power hungry and man eating.   Instead of how it was written in Birthright and Secret origin.  In those two stories we were shown two people with similar values and goals meet and recognize their ideal in the other.  

Just as I thought a lot of the women issues playing out right now were put to rest years ago (contraception anybody?), I thought we had turned the corner with Lois Lane.   Clearly I was wrong. 

I think in the stories DiDio and Lee have control over they’re going out of their way to separate Lois and Clark.  She’s not an investigative reporter in the New 52 so that keeps her out of both Clark’s and Superman’s daily life.   Jimmy takes the Lois role as Clark’s workmate but he’s a guy so he doesn’t put a damper on Clark’s love life. If Lois isn’t around then Clark is free to play the field.   That was I thought the final scene in Superman 1 was all about.  Hey, Lois isn’t interested, she’s sleeping with some other dude, so why can’t Clark move on?  Yet again, it’s Lois’s fault this is all happening.  What’s a guy to do?

 In the upcoming Earth-2 universe she’s dead before the story even begins.   I’m not going to blame the writer anymore than I think it’s fair to blame Rucka for co-writing World of New Krypton or Simone for Barbara walking.  I think these are editorial decisions and this is where I’m directing my ire.

I also don’t think what’s currently being done to Lois Lane is necessarily misogynistic.  I think she’s simply an unwanted obstacle.  I really think the current management sees Lois as an anchor and she’s somehow holding Superman back.  

I thought the same when DC sidelined Steve Trevor in Wonder Woman.   I’ve always wondered if it was also because he was nowhere near as physically strong as Wonder Woman and nobody knew how to write a story where the woman is physically stronger because it upsets the traditional dynamic we’re all conditioned to believe?   The animated Wonder Woman movie shows that Steve Trevor could be a very effective LI for Wonder Woman if written by people who understand that traditional gender roles don’t define love and maybe more importantly, inner strength is just as valuable as brute force.

I think the current management wants Superman to be Batman light and he can’t be if he’s happy.  They’ve killed his parents and taken away Lois in the new 52.  In Earth-2 they gave him happiness before the proverbial curtain rises but kill her as the catalyst to set Superman on the dark path they seem to want him to walk.

This, in my opinion is the core problem with the current day universe. They don’t see the value in a hopeful Superman.  They also don’t seem to understand nuance.  Superman can have a lover but that doesn’t mean his life is perfect.  He still has to face external and internal battles and he still makes mistakes.  

Why not focus on the internal struggles?   His compassion and his love are both his strengths and his Achilles’ heels.    I loved the conversation between Lois and Clark was when he was talking to Lois about Wonder Woman snapping Lord’s neck and Lois came to Diana’s defense.  She agreed with Diana’s actions.   I always wished this difference of opinion was fleshed out more and that maybe Lois stormed the batcave and spoke on Diana’s behalf or we saw an editorial she wrote championing Diana.   Missed opportunities.    

Actually I think DC missed the boat more often than not in telling compelling stories with Clark & Lois married.   Busiek, Simone and Rucka were the three, I felt at least, who wrote the marriage to its potential.  

So where is Lois now?  I think it’s a pretty dismal landscape.  The only consistent bright light for Lois Lane that I see is the upcoming Smallville book.  Fortunately, the series ended with Lois engaged to Clark and in on the secret so they can’t mess with that. 

I don’t even know how to coherently express how important I think this book is for Lois Lane and for the Clark/Lois relationship.  This is the chance for her fans to be heard but we need to put our proverbial money where our mouth is.   This has to sell in large enough numbers to get the attention of the press and DC Entertainment.  Money talks.

And if this is a successful book?  We have to be ready to hold the current DC Comics management’s feet to the fire and ask them why they’re treating Lois Lane the way they’ve been doing since Flashpoint. 

Wow.

PERFECT post about Lois Lane, right here. Here we have a strong, iconic, interesting character and the way DC Comics is treating her is just shameful and, frankly, uncreative.

Feb 26 '12

aflyinggrayson:

holyismstogoddamn:

Gee. I thought he was a boy. But he’s a man.

I got ‘im boss. And I’m kickin’ ‘im out on his butt.

“Good. I was counting on you making the first move. Because I intend to make the last!”

Reasons why Dick Grayson is not the playboy, jokey, push-over character some writers make him out to be.

Exhibit A: Teen Titans Annual #2 (1983)

The Teen-Wonder Years

Often during Dick’s tenure as Robin, people assume he was always fun loving and obedient to the law. You people could not be more wrong, especially Dick in his later teenage years as Robin.

For one (and this is why I will forever believe Marv Wolfman is the best writer of Dick Grayson who has put pen to paper so to speak,) Dick has a temper, and not just a slow burning one, it’s huge and can be set off by the tiniest spark.

For all of Dick’s better traits, he’s friendly, kind, witty, loving and a great leader…yes he is all those things, but he is also powerful, egotistical, possessive of a formidable temper, wary of all new-commers and, (as noted by his closest friends,) often representative of his nick-name.

Dick is not some sort of western Bishōnen, he’s imposing, powerful and, to put it bluntly, he’s dangerous.

It annoys me when you read authors who play up his witty side so much and lead some readers to believe Dick’s appearances in Batman comics is there purely as comic relief or regulated back to his childhood position of “side-kick distraction”. (Which is something else I disagree with.)

I am enjoying the way people like Scott Synder wrote Dick during the last run of Detective Comics and I like the direction Kyle Higgins is taking Dick in Nightwing. (Despite the fact I think Didio, who did want to kill Dick off if you remember, has asked Higgins to invent this ‘playboy side’ to Dick…but more of that later.)

So yes, Exibit A of my rant, and I’ll be posting some more of these examples.

_________________________________________

I also pulled out these panels to point out something about Kory’s relationship with Dick, that it also wasn’t this cutesy, fluffy first-love thing I’ve noticed some people trying to insist is was. It had just as many difficult moments as any real relationship has, and though Dick was in a difficult place, Kory never gave up on him or the possiblity of their relationship.

I think that also speaks volumes about Kory not being this two-dimensional character only made as an exotic girlfriend for the “leader of the team.”

________________________________________

(( Just going to leave this here because this is a perfect character study of Dick Grayson ))

^ Seriously. Perfection.

Feb 19 '12
burdge:

-Ira Glass

This is so true. Right now, I’m in that gap phase. I know the things I write (and, even more so, draw) aren’t that good. But if I keep practicing, I’ll keep getting better. And that’s the only way to go from someone who’s sort of talented at something, to someone who can actually create something amazing. I hope I’ll get there someday.

burdge:

-Ira Glass

This is so true. Right now, I’m in that gap phase. I know the things I write (and, even more so, draw) aren’t that good. But if I keep practicing, I’ll keep getting better. And that’s the only way to go from someone who’s sort of talented at something, to someone who can actually create something amazing. I hope I’ll get there someday.

(Source: alijayy)

Feb 10 '12
therearecertainshadesoflimelight:

calamityjon:

What does Superman see in Lois Lane?
Well, let’s set aside the obvious, to begin with - that’s she’s intelligent, beautiful and driven. Lois Lane is fiery and passionate, but compassionate and big-hearted, committed to her ideals, fearless, accomplished and brave. She’s wry, witty, sarcastic and clever, she takes no guff and she doesn’t acknowledge obstacles, she’s classy, brassy, bold and ultimately kind. She is, in short, enough for any hundred men.
But, yes, let’s set those aside, because as rare and exceptional a woman as Lois Lane is, surely she’s not the only one in the world. Superman has the universe at his disposal, and you have to ask what makes Lois Lane stand out among the beauties of a thousand planets, undersea kingdoms, alternate dimensions and limitless far-flung time periods. Why, in short, with all the women in a hundred universes to catch his eye, does he fall in love with the girl who works two desks over?
The relationship between Superman and Lois Lane changes every decade or so. When I was growing up in the post-Ordinary People years of constant self-analysis, they were as often estranged as they were an item, asking all those difficult questions people in long-term relationships were expected to ask themselves. This was a far cry from the by-turns white-hot and ice-cold triangle Lois, Clark and Superman maintained in the early days of the book, or the I Love Lucy hijinx which were the notorious mainstay of Lois Lane’s own comic in the early Sixties.
Still, the relationship changed from decade to decade - even stopped dead now and again - but they never parted. It’s always writ that Lois Lane is the girl for Superman. So … why?
Imagine this: Clark Kent - shy, awkward, fragile Clark Kent - works in an office with dozens of women. There are hundreds - and probably even thousands - of women working in his office building. There are millions of women in his city, who read his column, who know him from television, who bump up against him on the subway or see him the supermarket buying eggs.
And of all these women in their dozens and thousands and millions, only one - one - has ever looked at Clark Kent - with his bad posture and lack of confidence, with his shellaced-back hair and VFW donation eyeglass frames, his ugly red tie, his orthopedic shoes, his meek demeanor - and thought to herself “HE … might be Superman.”
Don’t underestimate the power of someone seeing through the worst in you and seeing only the best. Superman, after all, only truly exists because two kind, unassuming and deeply good people found him in the wild plains of Kansas and - rather than seeing him as an alien, or a dangerous unknown, or a plastic hassle - saw a beautiful son with tremendous powers who would do only good. And so he became.
And, of course, that’s how Superman sees everyone else; even the worst of us, even his greatest enemies, he sees past their weakness and sees only the best in them (Which is, to my mind, his greatest power, although that’s perhaps for another discussion).
So, in Clark Kent - or, at least, in the Clark Kent disguise he crafted to hide his dual identity - Superman has laid out all of his weaknesses, self-doubts and fears for everyone to see. It’s as if he were saying to the world “I’m so scared of being left alone that I make lousy excuses to keep everyone at a distance. I try to always help others at my own expense, but I’m worried that others see that as spinelessness. I am reluctant to assert myself for fear of scaring people off, so I cave in,” and so on and so on, and while everyone else only sees all the failings of Clark Kent, Lois Lane still looks at him and says, no nonsense, “No, you’re Superman, we both know it.”
You may conceivably interpret this as a selfish way of looking at love, I concede, if you look at it as though I’m suggesting that you fall most strongly in love with the person who most flatters you. To my mind, though, it’s not about flattery. Rather, it’s about the power of having someone acknowledge the worst in you, but believe in you to rise above it and love you all the more strongly for it - to even despise the worst in you but love the best in you all the more fiercely. It’s about the strength you get from that.
For the sake of full disclosure, let me share this with you: I have been married, as of today, for 11 years, 9 months, 3 weeks and 2 days. I did not have to look up that number, I always know exactly how long I’ve been married. I know this because marriage has been wonderful, and I don’t want to miss a day. And it has been wonderful because of this - I am not a catch. There’s a LOT wrong with me. I am no Brad Pitt, as they say.
And yet, despite that, every now and again over the last 11 years, 9 months, 3 weeks and 2 days, I wake up in the morning to find my girl wide awake and looking at me, beaming, her eyes bright, and I come to my senses and realize that she’s not seeing my fat, bald head or dumb, cranky face, but is seeing something in me that is better than I ever expected I could be, and which gives me strength of a fashion that is essential and impossible to describe.
So imagine Clark Kent sitting there, hunched over his desk, mustard on his tie and grimly awaiting Steve Lombard dropping a firecracker under his chair, and he steals a glance at that sharp-eyed brunette he’s had the hots for forever, and he’s never told her his biggest secret but she’s giving him a look that plainly says “I bet he’s wearing the costume right now, isn’t he?”
Imagine Superman, and all his responsibilities, and the danger and pressures and the temptations, and the deep well of strength it requires to have all that power and yet to do only good for others, and imagine where it comes from: It comes from the woman he loves believing - knowing - that he has that strength, despite everything else.
Superman is totally a love story.

 Sometimes, on Friday, I just want to reblog things I really love.
And I really, really love this.
And I just can’t express enough how much I hope DC Comics understands this.  Because marriage or no marriage, it does feel right now like DC Comics does not understand this.  And I’m not even talking about the marriage.  I’m talking outright about the very nature of this relationship and what it means to people.  What they are doing right now with Superman and Lois Lane suggests that they do not get this.  And I really don’t understand how it is possible that millions of fans understand this, and television adapations (many of which have women on the staff ) seem to understand this but the people who actually have the honor of writing these characters do not get this.  Why is there such a huge disconnect between the care and thought that is given to this relationship in other mediums in ways that simply do not match up with some of the extremely careless comments and treatment by the people who actually have the honor or writing them?   I really hope I’m wrong.  I hope they prove me wrong.

So, I started tearing up about halfway through reading this.
I hate you, DC. I really do, sometimes.

therearecertainshadesoflimelight:

calamityjon:

What does Superman see in Lois Lane?

Well, let’s set aside the obvious, to begin with - that’s she’s intelligent, beautiful and driven. Lois Lane is fiery and passionate, but compassionate and big-hearted, committed to her ideals, fearless, accomplished and brave. She’s wry, witty, sarcastic and clever, she takes no guff and she doesn’t acknowledge obstacles, she’s classy, brassy, bold and ultimately kind. She is, in short, enough for any hundred men.

But, yes, let’s set those aside, because as rare and exceptional a woman as Lois Lane is, surely she’s not the only one in the world. Superman has the universe at his disposal, and you have to ask what makes Lois Lane stand out among the beauties of a thousand planets, undersea kingdoms, alternate dimensions and limitless far-flung time periods. Why, in short, with all the women in a hundred universes to catch his eye, does he fall in love with the girl who works two desks over?

The relationship between Superman and Lois Lane changes every decade or so. When I was growing up in the post-Ordinary People years of constant self-analysis, they were as often estranged as they were an item, asking all those difficult questions people in long-term relationships were expected to ask themselves. This was a far cry from the by-turns white-hot and ice-cold triangle Lois, Clark and Superman maintained in the early days of the book, or the I Love Lucy hijinx which were the notorious mainstay of Lois Lane’s own comic in the early Sixties.

Still, the relationship changed from decade to decade - even stopped dead now and again - but they never parted. It’s always writ that Lois Lane is the girl for Superman. So … why?

Imagine this: Clark Kent - shy, awkward, fragile Clark Kent - works in an office with dozens of women. There are hundreds - and probably even thousands - of women working in his office building. There are millions of women in his city, who read his column, who know him from television, who bump up against him on the subway or see him the supermarket buying eggs.

And of all these women in their dozens and thousands and millions, only one - one - has ever looked at Clark Kent - with his bad posture and lack of confidence, with his shellaced-back hair and VFW donation eyeglass frames, his ugly red tie, his orthopedic shoes, his meek demeanor - and thought to herself “HE … might be Superman.”

Don’t underestimate the power of someone seeing through the worst in you and seeing only the best. Superman, after all, only truly exists because two kind, unassuming and deeply good people found him in the wild plains of Kansas and - rather than seeing him as an alien, or a dangerous unknown, or a plastic hassle - saw a beautiful son with tremendous powers who would do only good. And so he became.

And, of course, that’s how Superman sees everyone else; even the worst of us, even his greatest enemies, he sees past their weakness and sees only the best in them (Which is, to my mind, his greatest power, although that’s perhaps for another discussion).

So, in Clark Kent - or, at least, in the Clark Kent disguise he crafted to hide his dual identity - Superman has laid out all of his weaknesses, self-doubts and fears for everyone to see. It’s as if he were saying to the world “I’m so scared of being left alone that I make lousy excuses to keep everyone at a distance. I try to always help others at my own expense, but I’m worried that others see that as spinelessness. I am reluctant to assert myself for fear of scaring people off, so I cave in,” and so on and so on, and while everyone else only sees all the failings of Clark Kent, Lois Lane still looks at him and says, no nonsense, “No, you’re Superman, we both know it.”

You may conceivably interpret this as a selfish way of looking at love, I concede, if you look at it as though I’m suggesting that you fall most strongly in love with the person who most flatters you. To my mind, though, it’s not about flattery. Rather, it’s about the power of having someone acknowledge the worst in you, but believe in you to rise above it and love you all the more strongly for it - to even despise the worst in you but love the best in you all the more fiercely. It’s about the strength you get from that.

For the sake of full disclosure, let me share this with you: I have been married, as of today, for 11 years, 9 months, 3 weeks and 2 days. I did not have to look up that number, I always know exactly how long I’ve been married. I know this because marriage has been wonderful, and I don’t want to miss a day. And it has been wonderful because of this - I am not a catch. There’s a LOT wrong with me. I am no Brad Pitt, as they say.

And yet, despite that, every now and again over the last 11 years, 9 months, 3 weeks and 2 days, I wake up in the morning to find my girl wide awake and looking at me, beaming, her eyes bright, and I come to my senses and realize that she’s not seeing my fat, bald head or dumb, cranky face, but is seeing something in me that is better than I ever expected I could be, and which gives me strength of a fashion that is essential and impossible to describe.

So imagine Clark Kent sitting there, hunched over his desk, mustard on his tie and grimly awaiting Steve Lombard dropping a firecracker under his chair, and he steals a glance at that sharp-eyed brunette he’s had the hots for forever, and he’s never told her his biggest secret but she’s giving him a look that plainly says “I bet he’s wearing the costume right now, isn’t he?”

Imagine Superman, and all his responsibilities, and the danger and pressures and the temptations, and the deep well of strength it requires to have all that power and yet to do only good for others, and imagine where it comes from: It comes from the woman he loves believing - knowing - that he has that strength, despite everything else.

Superman is totally a love story.

 Sometimes, on Friday, I just want to reblog things I really love.

And I really, really love this.

And I just can’t express enough how much I hope DC Comics understands this.  Because marriage or no marriage, it does feel right now like DC Comics does not understand this.  And I’m not even talking about the marriage.  I’m talking outright about the very nature of this relationship and what it means to people.  What they are doing right now with Superman and Lois Lane suggests that they do not get this.  And I really don’t understand how it is possible that millions of fans understand this, and television adapations (many of which have women on the staff ) seem to understand this but the people who actually have the honor of writing these characters do not get this.  Why is there such a huge disconnect between the care and thought that is given to this relationship in other mediums in ways that simply do not match up with some of the extremely careless comments and treatment by the people who actually have the honor or writing them?   I really hope I’m wrong.  I hope they prove me wrong.

So, I started tearing up about halfway through reading this.

I hate you, DC. I really do, sometimes.

Feb 9 '12
"It is a very funny thing that the sleepier you are, the longer you take about getting to bed."
C.S. Lewis, The Silver Chair (via darkcanuck)